A scene from the latest tour of “Einstein on the Beach,” on a stop in Montpellier, France. Photo by Lesley Leslie-Spinks

"Some works of art become mythical, either because they are so important or because few people actually know them. “Einstein on the Beach,” the 1976 intermissionless four-and-a-half-hour opera by Robert Wilson and Philip Glass, qualifies on both counts. When “Einstein” opens a 10-day run at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Sept. 14, it will be the first time New York has seen it in 20 years…”

I’ll be in the audience on Sunday, full of anticipation.

A scene from the latest tour of “Einstein on the Beach,” on a stop in Montpellier, France. Photo by Lesley Leslie-Spinks

"Some works of art become mythical, either because they are so important or because few people actually know them. “Einstein on the Beach,” the 1976 intermissionless four-and-a-half-hour opera by Robert Wilson and Philip Glass, qualifies on both counts. When “Einstein” opens a 10-day run at the Brooklyn Academy of Music on Sept. 14, it will be the first time New York has seen it in 20 years…”

I’ll be in the audience on Sunday, full of anticipation.

jessbennett:

god i love hardcore-pretty/pretty-hardcore things

When I danced, I never broke my shank (step 1), but I did break in the box (step 3), bang my shoes on the concrete driveway (“to take out the noise;” I’m still unsure if that really helped), and occasionally I darned (step 6). I used matches to burn the ends of my ribbon (it prevents the satin from fraying), which are always hand-sewn by dancers on their shoes (along with the elastics) to ensure a custom fit.

You know that scene in Black Swan when the camera shows the detail of Nina breaking in her shoes? That scene’s accuracy meant so much to me.

minusmanhattan:

Ballet Master by Andreas Franke from her series “Life Below the Surface.”

minusmanhattan:

Ballet Master by Andreas Franke from her series “Life Below the Surface.”

Ballet vs. Flying Food

The New York Times dispatch from MCU Park observed:

In the stands, most fans did not seem overly impressed with the ballerinas, seeming to treat them as just another sideshow to keep them amused in between innings. They were far more excited and loud when quesadillas were tossed into the stands from the field.

Yep. Sounds like the Coney Island I know.

Sunday brunch & ballet

Sunday brunch & ballet

This afternoon’s performance at the Kennedy Center met all my expectations of exquisite ballet.

This afternoon’s performance at the Kennedy Center met all my expectations of exquisite ballet.

“… como el musguito en la piedra, ay si, si, si …” (Like moss on a stone) | Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch returns to BAM in October.
Chile is the focus of this work, the last Bausch made before her death in 2009. For those who loved the film Pina, take note.

“… como el musguito en la piedra, ay si, si, si …” (Like moss on a stone) | Tanztheater Wuppertal Pina Bausch returns to BAM in October.

Chile is the focus of this work, the last Bausch made before her death in 2009. For those who loved the film Pina, take note.

First Position, a ballet documentary.

Who’s coming to the movies with me on May 4? (Special thanks to Nancy for putting it on my radar.)

peterwknox:

startmeup:

I’m going to make a bold claim and say that last night I saw one of the most beautiful movies I have ever seen, Pina, which is playing at BAM in 3-D.

As someone who knows very little technically about dance- I have not been able to stop thinking about movement since I left the theater. Each shot of this movie was amazingly well art directed with an incredible use of light, space and color. The tribute performances to Pina, which take place all over the German city of Wuppertal, each feel meticulously contained but yet explode with energy.

More info about the talented late Pina Bausch here.

Basically a must-see in 3D.

As a longtime dance lover, this audience reaction brings me such joy. The dance world lost two remarkable choreographers in 2009, Pina Bausch and Merce Cunningham. That Pina’s work not only lives on but reaches a wider audience in Wim Wenders’ film is cause for celebration.

Without doubt, it has my vote for an Oscar.

Natalya Arkhipova of the Bolshoi Ballet, dancing the Sugar Plum Fairy solo as it should be, 1989. I marvel at her technique, especially at the 0:55 second mark (grand foutetté en tournat, attitude croisée, double piourette, foutetté rond de jambe… and a hopping, turning step whose name I can’t recall. AND repeat.).