On Friday night Grammar and I watched Red Hook Summer at BAM, and Spike Lee himself took questions from the audience. He makes brave choices with this one, and I highly recommend seeing it.

On Friday night Grammar and I watched Red Hook Summer at BAM, and Spike Lee himself took questions from the audience. He makes brave choices with this one, and I highly recommend seeing it.

In his 2008 review of Tell No One, David Denby says it best: “This is a thriller that’s more about discovery than about action.”
Denby outlines the premise:

“Tell No One” is devoted to the explication of a single, devastating event, which we see at the beginning. At a lake deep in the Rambouillet Forest, near Paris, a happily married couple, Dr. Alex Beck (François Cluzet) and his social-worker wife, Margot (Marie-Josée Croze), celebrate their anniversary by going for a naked swim in the moonlight. After resting on a raft, they have a tiny quarrel, and Margot swims ashore. Still lying on the raft, Alex hears a muffled cry from the woods; he swims frantically, but when he climbs out of the water someone clobbers him, and he falls back into the lake. The movie then leaps ahead eight years: Margot was killed that night; Alex, a pediatrician, works in a clinic outside Paris. He’s still in mourning, still eaten up by what happened—by what he didn’t see, by what he doesn’t know. He can never return to his private Eden, the erotic harmony of the forest and the lake, but he longs for it nonetheless.

I watched the movie in the theater during its original New York release, and it left such a strong impression that I confidently declared it a favorite. Since then four years have passed, and acknowledging that tastes change and memories fade, I recently wondered, “Does Tell No One still belong on my short list?” Sitting on my couch a few nights back, I again got lost in the unraveling of what really happened and caught up in the emotional pivots.I encourage you to watch it yourself, which is to say, “Yes, still a favorite.”
(Image via Music Box Films by way of NYTimes)

In his 2008 review of Tell No One, David Denby says it best: “This is a thriller that’s more about discovery than about action.”

Denby outlines the premise:

“Tell No One” is devoted to the explication of a single, devastating event, which we see at the beginning. At a lake deep in the Rambouillet Forest, near Paris, a happily married couple, Dr. Alex Beck (François Cluzet) and his social-worker wife, Margot (Marie-Josée Croze), celebrate their anniversary by going for a naked swim in the moonlight. After resting on a raft, they have a tiny quarrel, and Margot swims ashore. Still lying on the raft, Alex hears a muffled cry from the woods; he swims frantically, but when he climbs out of the water someone clobbers him, and he falls back into the lake. The movie then leaps ahead eight years: Margot was killed that night; Alex, a pediatrician, works in a clinic outside Paris. He’s still in mourning, still eaten up by what happened—by what he didn’t see, by what he doesn’t know. He can never return to his private Eden, the erotic harmony of the forest and the lake, but he longs for it nonetheless.

I watched the movie in the theater during its original New York release, and it left such a strong impression that I confidently declared it a favorite. Since then four years have passed, and acknowledging that tastes change and memories fade, I recently wondered, “Does Tell No One still belong on my short list?” Sitting on my couch a few nights back, I again got lost in the unraveling of what really happened and caught up in the emotional pivots.

I encourage you to watch it yourself, which is to say, “Yes, still a favorite.”

(Image via Music Box Films by way of NYTimes)

First Position, a ballet documentary.

Who’s coming to the movies with me on May 4? (Special thanks to Nancy for putting it on my radar.)

thefeeling:

“As a result, viewings of Midnight in Paris on the big screen became events in the Smug Olympics of the urban iPad class, with audiences risking physical injury as they competed to laugh the loudest to demonstrate to all around that yes, they know who Gertrude Stein is. It was laughter directed at the audience itself, not at the screen. Laughing to show you get the joke. Or since there are no jokes, laughing to show you get the reference.”

—I [Richard Rushfield] discuss my bafflement at the Midnight In Paris phenomenon over at The Daily Beast (via richardrushfield)

Co-signed. Though I’m obliged to add that the bothersome, knowing laughter at my viewing—at Lincoln Plaza months after the release, thankfully in a half-full theater—came from the grey-haired set. So, bad taste cuts across generations.

Earlier in the year I happened upon an art exhibit in San Francisco showcasing the Stein’s collection, and memories of that gallery walk made the movie nods pale all the more.

peterwknox:

startmeup:

I’m going to make a bold claim and say that last night I saw one of the most beautiful movies I have ever seen, Pina, which is playing at BAM in 3-D.

As someone who knows very little technically about dance- I have not been able to stop thinking about movement since I left the theater. Each shot of this movie was amazingly well art directed with an incredible use of light, space and color. The tribute performances to Pina, which take place all over the German city of Wuppertal, each feel meticulously contained but yet explode with energy.

More info about the talented late Pina Bausch here.

Basically a must-see in 3D.

As a longtime dance lover, this audience reaction brings me such joy. The dance world lost two remarkable choreographers in 2009, Pina Bausch and Merce Cunningham. That Pina’s work not only lives on but reaches a wider audience in Wim Wenders’ film is cause for celebration.

Without doubt, it has my vote for an Oscar.

Gatsby in 3-D

Baz Luhrmann is directing The Great Gatsby in 3-D, and after seeing Pinaan exquisite marriage of film and dance—my first reaction isn’t a scoff.

But did you know that Hitchcock himself made a 3-D movie??

To examine the potential of actors in 3-D without the gimmickry of contemporary action sequences, Mr. Luhrmann turned to Alfred Hitchcock’s 3-D version of “Dial M for Murder,” from 1954. It wasn’t easy. He found only two projectors, one in New York, one in Burbank, Calif., that could still play that film.

The sensation of moving through it with Ray Milland, Grace Kelly and Robert Cummings sealed the deal — both for himself and for Mr. DiCaprio and the troupe, who also studied the Hitchcock film. “It was like theater,” Mr. Luhrmann said.

Wim Wenders’ Pina. Christmas afternoon, Nancy and I have a movie date. Having seen Nefés, Bamboo Blues, and Vollmond performed by the company at BAM, I’m filled with anticipation.

Martha Marcy May Marlene

The trailer is great, and onscreen the title works. But I’m having a hell of a time remembering it in conversations with friends or emails about movie dates. (“That MMM movie…” “the one about the girls in the woods.” “something Mary something something”)

Mary? Nope. Note even one of the four, despite all the y’s and r’s and a’s.

Maybe writing this post will finally nail it into my memory bank.

Cliff Martinez composes brilliant movie scores. I’ll soon add Drive to my collection.

Cliff Martinez composes brilliant movie scores. I’ll soon add Drive to my collection.

Things I loved in Drive

The overall intensity, visual landscapes, the economy of the story, the atmosphere of the sound design, and sharp emotional shifts. And those titles are a nice touch.