“As I said, we don’t know how [the ruling on the Affordable Care Act] will go. But it’s hard not to feel a sense of foreboding — and to worry that the nation’s already badly damaged faith in the Supreme Court’s ability to stand above politics is about to take another severe hit.”

—Paul Krugman, Broccoli and Bad Faith

capitalnewyork:

Ride the NYC subway?

Meet the boss of your commute: MTA chairman Joe Lhota

Lhota, a lifelong conservative Republican, was “installed by a governor who doesn’t much care about transit to straighten out the finances and public image of an authority that is a political pinata, all while keeping the trains running on time.”

In his first 100 days, he has:

  • Implemented Fastrack, a program that shuts down entire subway lines for a series of evenings to increase repair efficiency
  • Argued the case for public investment in transportation
  • Loudly resisted the House of Representative’s efforts to cut the gas tax
  • Traveled to Albany seven times to discuss transit issues with the executive and legislative branch, and where he lobbied alongside Transport Workers Union head John Samuelsen
  • “Compared to Jay Walder, who literally never met with the transportation or civic groups that cared about the M.T.A., he met with me individually and some other people individually,” said Gene Russianoff, staff attorney for the Straphangers Campaign. “He’s very direct. There’s really no B.S.”

How do you think he’s doing?

Though I’m far from giving the MTA a gold star, I like what I read about Lhota. Click through for the full report.

officialssay:

“My job description as I have defined it is to save Western civilization.”

—Newt Gingrich in a 1979 address to his congressional staff, via The Washington Post’s recent review of thousands of documents, spanning nearly three decades, that detail the politician’s career.

If salvation is Newt Gingrich, give me damnation.

noraleah:

joyengel:

This is a photo of the “experts” currently testifying to Congress about birth control and women’s health. 
What’s missing from this photo?

Fuck this shit I’m going to get some chocolate.

And I need some Daily Show therapy.

noraleah:

joyengel:

This is a photo of the “experts” currently testifying to Congress about birth control and women’s health. 

What’s missing from this photo?

Fuck this shit I’m going to get some chocolate.

And I need some Daily Show therapy.

“But politics is not, ultimately, a fantasy. Politics has a solid reality to it, one that the candidates are about to confront when people, with real lives, walk into the polls. If their campaigns have not glimpsed that already, at the doorsteps and events and conversations in diners, than they have already lost, and rightly so. Calling what happens on an actual election day the “ground game,” or G.O.T.V.—Get Out The Vote—makes it sound like another scene in the play, but it’s the one in which the candidates learn that they are not the only actors, or even the most important ones. If there is one thing we have learned in 2011—in which Time, in a better than average choice, picked The Protester as the Person of the Year—it is that the lifespans of political frauds do have an end. Maybe, in a few cases, that will come as soon as next Tuesday.”

—Amy Davidson, Gingrich’s Phony War

I hope she’s correct.

“It all adds up to one of the most disastrous summits imaginable. A continent which has risen to multiple occasions over the past 66 years has, in 2011, decided to implode in a spectacle of pathetic ignominy. Its individual countries will survive, of course, albeit in unnecessarily straitened circumstances. But the dream of European unity is dissolving in real time, as the eyes of the world look on in disbelief.”

—Felix Salmon, on the EU summit. Paul Krugman shares his grim outlook.

rachelfershleiser:

This morning, in the wake of the raid on the Occupation, and the reacquisition of the People’s Volumes from the NY sanitation dept. Patti Smith sent the People’s Library some words.
i am with you all from across the sea
every concert, interview etc
i call out to occupy and support those that do.
what you are doing is only a beginning.
if it gets too tough in the winter
get healthy regroup and come back.
don’t be sorry about anything.
give everyone a salute from me
people have the power.
(via Occupy Wall Street Library | The People’s Library at Liberty Plaza)

rachelfershleiser:

This morning, in the wake of the raid on the Occupation, and the reacquisition of the People’s Volumes from the NY sanitation dept. Patti Smith sent the People’s Library some words.

i am with you all from across the sea

every concert, interview etc

i call out to occupy and support those that do.

what you are doing is only a beginning.

if it gets too tough in the winter

get healthy regroup and come back.

don’t be sorry about anything.

give everyone a salute from me

people have the power.

(via Occupy Wall Street Library | The People’s Library at Liberty Plaza)

(via housingworksbookstore)

After Zuccotti: What Now for Occupy Wall Street?

newyorker:

What is needed is some way to build upon these successes while maintaining the energy and enthusiasm that O.W.S. has unleashed. The recent history of the “Indignants” in Spain shows that a heterogeneous protest movement can survive the loss of its focal point. In June, after repeated clashes with the police, the Spanish protesters decided to leave their encampment in Madrid’s Puerta del Sol. The movement lives on: last month, hundreds of thousands of people marched in its support through Madrid, Barcelona, and other cities.

Can O.W.S. make a similar transition? I hope so.

- John Cassidy on whether Occupy Wall Street will be able to build on its successes while maintaining energy and enthusiasm: http://nyr.kr/tMxy7m

It looks like today’s court ruling favors the eviction, but all is not lost for OWS.

capitalnewyork:

SCENES FROM THE RAID; BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER 

Before the raid had been called, Occupy Wall Street organizers had  planned a “day of action” on Nov. 17, in which the idea was going to be  to physically occupy Wall Street itself. Protesters vowed that if the  police raid was intended to thwart that plan, it had been a mistake.
Standing  outside Judson, Jeff Stark, 27, a member of the committee responsible  for planning the day, said, “Everyone expected it to happen after the  17th. I think it was a huge strategic error to empty the park before  then. That’s just going to get more people out on the streets. And not  being tied to one geographic location, the movement’s just going to get  stronger.”


Excellent reporting from Capital

capitalnewyork:

SCENES FROM THE RAID; BEFORE, DURING AND AFTER

Before the raid had been called, Occupy Wall Street organizers had planned a “day of action” on Nov. 17, in which the idea was going to be to physically occupy Wall Street itself. Protesters vowed that if the police raid was intended to thwart that plan, it had been a mistake.

Standing outside Judson, Jeff Stark, 27, a member of the committee responsible for planning the day, said, “Everyone expected it to happen after the 17th. I think it was a huge strategic error to empty the park before then. That’s just going to get more people out on the streets. And not being tied to one geographic location, the movement’s just going to get stronger.”

Excellent reporting from Capital

Judge (Temporarily) Reopens Zuccotti Park

shortformblog:

With a judge issuing a temporary order allowing protesters, with tents if they choose, back inside their former encampment at Zuccotti Park, protesters who had regrouped at Foley Square, about 12 blocks north of Zuccotti,  have already started marching back.

Dashiell Bennett has the full details on what happened at Zuccotti over night. Protesters began arriving at Foley Square, around 4 a.m., and by 8 a.m. a kitchen had been set up, drummers drummed, and a crowd had arrived en masse. The protesters started moving from Foley at around 8 a.m., with the plan to march from back to Zuccotti via City Hall (where Mayor Michael Bloomberg is holding a press conference) and the intersection of Canal and Sixth Avenue. But according to Firedog Lake contributor Cynthia Kouril, police blocked them from City Hall.

A judge ruled this morning that the police couldn’t keep protesters and their gear from Zuccotti Park (see below) but scheduled a hearing for 11:30 a.m. Tuesday morning where the city will need to “show cause” for its eviction of the protesters. Read more.

Man, we step away for five hours and a judge already makes a ruling on Zucotti Park? Damn, that’s service.

Time will tell, but I think the mayor and NYPD made strategic mistakes in this morning’s eviction.

(via shortformblog)